Exodus International Leaders Says Gay People Will Be in Heaven

by Nathan A. Cherry, 07/10/2012

The head of Exodus International, Alan Chambers, is under fire for stating that he believes active homosexuals can go to Heaven. As a result, some are calling for his removal as the organizations president. The debate over homosexuality has many sides, and  many faces. But one irrefutable biblical truth is that no one living in unrepentant sin can enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Therefore, if homosexuality is sin – and clearly according to the Bible it is sin – there is no way for an unrepentant homosexual to be saved and go to Heaven. No one disputes that those struggling with unwanted same-sex attractions can be saved and go to Heaven, and no one would doubt that a homosexual refusing to act on his sinful inclinations but rather choosing to deny the flesh and refuse to indulge in homosexuality in obedience to Scripture can be saved and go to Heaven. But the idea that a proud, unrepentant homosexual, living an openly gay life can be saved and then without repenting and turning from homosexuality can go to Heaven is unbiblical and wrong. Click here to read the original article.

About Nathan Cherry

Nathan Cherry is the chief editor and blogger for the Engage Family Minute blog, the official blog of the FPCWV. He serves also as the Regional Development Coordinator as a liaison to the pastor's of West Virginia. He is a pro-life, pro-traditional marriage, pro-religious freedom conservative. He is also a husband, father, pastor, author, musician, and follower of Jesus Christ.

“Mommy had an abortion.”

By Kelly Clinger, 05/08/2012

Kelly Clinger

Kelly Clinger (center) now shares her story as a spokesman for the "Silent No More" campaign.

Those are words I never thought I would say to my children. In fact, I was never going to tell them. I didn’t want to explain what abortion was much less tell them that their own mother had made such a terrible, sinful choice…TWICE.

When I was asked to be a spokesperson for the Silent No More Awareness Campaign toward the end of 2010, they wanted to be sure that my immediate family knew my past before I began traveling the country talking about it. Of course my husband knew most of the details (although more things surface as time goes on), but how was I going to tell my kids that I killed two of their siblings?

My daughter was 14 and my son was 8 at the time.  I didn’t want them to be disappointed in me. I didn’t want them to hate me. I didn’t want them to feel about me the way I felt about myself.

I sat the kids down on the couch and took a deep breath. I asked them if they knew what abortion was. My daughter said she had heard the word before but wasn’t sure what it was. My son was clueless. As I began to explain it, the horror was all over their faces. “How could anyone do that?” my son asked. He kept asking questions, but my daughter’s silence told me that she knew there was a reason I was talking to them about abortion.

I began to cry and said, “Mommy had two abortions 10 years ago. You have 2 siblings in heaven.”

[Read more...]

About Nathan Cherry

Nathan Cherry is the chief editor and blogger for the Engage Family Minute blog, the official blog of the FPCWV. He serves also as the Regional Development Coordinator as a liaison to the pastor's of West Virginia. He is a pro-life, pro-traditional marriage, pro-religious freedom conservative. He is also a husband, father, pastor, author, musician, and follower of Jesus Christ.

UK: british Committee Investigates a Five Year Old?

Kids end up making other kids cry. This is just a reality of life. They hit other kids. They tease and poke fun at other kids. They even push other kids down on the playground. It all seems to be part of growing up and being a kid.

And generally these incidents are handled at the school, or perhaps with a quick parent teacher conference, to ensure that such incidents don’t happen again. And that’s as far as the matter goes.

 

Not this time.

 

Jasmine McCain, a five year old at a British school said something that made her classmate cry. As a result a special committee was formed to investigate the matter; all while her mother, Jennie, a part-time receptionist at the school has been asked not to come to work until after the investigation is over.

 

And what could a five year old have possibly said that resulted in such actions? As reported in the religionclause and churchtimes websites, little Jasmine told her friend she would go to hell without believing in God.

 

Granted, the prospect of going to hell is terrifying, and would cause anyone to cry in fear of the possibility. But is a governor’s committee investigation of the “incident” really necessary? Are those who speak out regarding their religious beliefs really in the same category as a suspected terrorist or pedophile?

 

It is as this point that freedom of religion and free speech meet head on in a collision of irreconcilable values. For, if a person is a true follower of any particular faith, especially one that believes in a literal heaven and literal hell, the only option is to share that faith with friends and loved ones in an effort to secure their eternal future. To do anything less is to passively deny the very faith one claims to adhere to.

 

In this collision of religion and free speech must exist a measure of tolerance. I, for example, don’t agree with the doctrine of the Jehovah’s witnesses. But I believe they should be allowed to share their faith with others. I don’t agree with Hindu’s, Muslims, or Buddhists, but they too should be protected and allowed to share peaceably with others.

 

And quite honestly it isn’t that difficult a case to figure out. I don’t even need a committee or investigation to conclude the matter. People should be allowed to share their faith, values, beliefs, or anything else they choose with another person. That other person then has the freedom to agree, disagree, or simply ignore what was just said. It’s kind of like having an open, honest conversation in which the free exchange of ideas is accomplished.

 

What does it say about us as people when we are investigating five-year old Christians for sharing their beliefs but we allow Muslims to openly practice their faith without a word? What kind of message are we sending? Are we only going to protect some religious beliefs while persecuting others?

 

If religious freedom is going to be granted for some, then it must be granted for all. And if we are going to ask people to be tolerant of some religious beliefs then we must be tolerant of all beliefs.

 

Further Food for Thought:

Professor Censors, Insults Student During Speech

 
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About Nathan Cherry

Nathan Cherry is the chief editor and blogger for the Engage Family Minute blog, the official blog of the FPCWV. He serves also as the Regional Development Coordinator as a liaison to the pastor's of West Virginia. He is a pro-life, pro-traditional marriage, pro-religious freedom conservative. He is also a husband, father, pastor, author, musician, and follower of Jesus Christ.