There’s (Not) an App for That

As major fan of products produced by Apple, I was disappointed to read this morning that it had pulled an, “anti-gay app” from the iTunes store, as the headline put it.

Anti-gay?  What could this app be?  My mind set to racing.  Perhaps the Westboro Baptist Church loonies finally became tech-savvy enough to create an app.  Maybe there was a fringe group who decided to write an app about the abomination of homosexual behavior.  Labeling the app as, “anti-gay” made me think that it must be something profoundly negative and inherently belittling of homosexual behavior.

What I found was that Apple had been beckoned by activists at the Huffington Post to pull the app bearing the Manhattan Declaration.

App affirming marriage as one man and one woman gets the boot from iTunes.

If you don’t know, last year (right around Thanksgiving, as a matter of fact), religious leaders from Evangelical, Catholic, and Orthodox traditions united to sign a statement that was billed as, “a call of Christian conscience.”  Most notably, Chuck Colson and Robert P. George were chief in developing the document that explained historical, philosophical, and theological support for pro-life, pro-marriage, and pro-religious liberty positions.

Now, the statement was not without controversy upon its release – even within the Christian world.  Dr. John MacArthur and others declined to sign onto the statement because it conflated Protestant and Catholic theology – a conflation the Reformers died to separate under the Reformation’s cry of sola scriptura.

Naturally, for those who wish to expand the rhetoric of pro-choice politics, redefine marriage, or limit religious freedom to freedom of worship, the Manhattan Declaration was a lightening rod for criticism.  But the most “lightening” came from same-sex activists.

But, my purpose is not to recall the history (or histrionics) of all that has happened since the November 2009 release of the Manhattan Declaration.  I want to look at the current complaints and compare it to the target.  Is the Manhattan Declaration a statement of Orthodox belief or little more than a belittling, bigoted rhetoric of an out-of-touch religious right?

[Read more...]

About Jeremy Dys

Jeremy Dys is the FPCWV's President and General Counsel. In addition to his duties of providing strategic vision and leadership to the FPCWV, Dys is the chief lobbyist and spokesman. Dys is regularly featured in local, state, and national print, radio, and television outlets. He lives close to Charleston with his wife and growing family.

Mohler: “Parenthood Matters. Just Ask Steve Jobs.”

Are parents more comfortable with the app store because of Steve Jobs?

Mohler, again, nails it in his commentary in the continuing saga with Steve Jobs, the app store, and a journalist wanting freedom for pornography.  In short, parenthood matters:

The Internet is still the domain of the pornographers, and there is little chance of that changing soon. Furthermore, any device with a Web browser can still download porn. The digital world is rife with sexually explicit material, and this includes many musical and film offerings through Apple’s iTunes store. Still, the “no porn” decision for the App Store is remarkable on its own.

While Wall Street, Hollywood, and Silicon Valley do their best to interpret what all this means, one dimension of this development is clear – parenthood matters.

Steve Jobs made this clear in his retort to Ryan Tate that he “might care more about porn when you have kids.” No kidding. Parenthood changes everything about one’s outlook on life and its challenges. A parent lacks the luxury of believing the world is all about himself or herself as individuals. Parents necessarily and understandably begin to think of the world in terms of how their children, and by extension the children of others as well, engage the world. This concern extends to the digital world, where the generation of young “digital natives” will spend much of their lives.

Ryan Tate got more than he bargained for when he made his protest to Steve Jobs. In a strange way, we are now all in his debt, because the response from Steve Jobs now puts Apple on the line. In the end, the real meaning of this media eruption is less about computers and “apps” and more about parents and kids.

Parenthood matters. Just ask Steve Jobs.

via AlbertMohler.com – Pornography — The Difference Being a Parent Makes.

About Jeremy Dys

Jeremy Dys is the FPCWV's President and General Counsel. In addition to his duties of providing strategic vision and leadership to the FPCWV, Dys is the chief lobbyist and spokesman. Dys is regularly featured in local, state, and national print, radio, and television outlets. He lives close to Charleston with his wife and growing family.

One More Reason to buy a Mac

Steve Jobs: "You might care more about porn when you have kids.”

Anyone who knows me, knows I swear by my Mac.  What can I say?  I need a computer that works!

Mac’s aren’t infallible, and users of them need to remember their families are WAY more important than whatever app just launched.  Still, Steve Jobs just did something that vaulted my affection for his company.  Sure, there are political issues that make me gravely disappointed with Apple (like their heavy support against Prop 8 in 2008), but this story linked by Justin Taylor at the Gospel Coalition’s Between Two Worlds blog really made me impressed:

Another aspect of Job’s defiance of critics has been less commented on. Jobs has argued that he wants his portable computer devices to not sell or stock pornography.

When a critic emailed him to say that this infringed his freedoms, Jobs emailed back and told him to buy a different type of computer.

Steve Jobs is a fan of Bob Dylan. So one customer emailed him to ask how Dylan would feel about Jobs restrictions of customers freedoms.

The CEO of Apple replied to say that he values:

Freedom from programs that steal your private data. Freedom from programs that trash your battery. Freedom from porn. Yep, freedom. The times they are a changin and some traditional PC folks feel their world is slipping away. It is.

The interlocuter replied:

[Read more...]

About Jeremy Dys

Jeremy Dys is the FPCWV's President and General Counsel. In addition to his duties of providing strategic vision and leadership to the FPCWV, Dys is the chief lobbyist and spokesman. Dys is regularly featured in local, state, and national print, radio, and television outlets. He lives close to Charleston with his wife and growing family.